Grigg Family Tree

Rev.Thomas Nattle Grigg

Male 1811 - 1884  (73 years)


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  • Name Rev.Thomas Nattle Grigg 
    Born 14 Feb 1811  Duloe,Cornwall, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Occupation Chaplain Of Van Diemans Land Co 
    Died 29 Feb 1884  Theberton Estate,Maskelyia,Ceylon Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I96  griggfamilytree
    Last Modified 11 May 2014 

    Father Joseph Grigg,   b. 12 Aug 1764, Duloe, Cornwall, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Oct 1824, Manor of Bodbrane,Duloe Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 60 years) 
    Mother Christiana Nattle,   b. 1771, Duloe,Cornwall Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1847, Shepton Mallett District, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years) 
    Married 27 Mar 1794  Duloe, Cornwall Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • [BO:Daughter of William Nattle,Esq. of Cadson, St Eve,Cornwall:BO]
    Family ID F52  Group Sheet

    Family 1 Jemima Stokes Burt,   d. 1863, Clifton,Bristol,Gloustershire Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married 5 Jul 1834  Damerell, Devon England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Thomas James Grigg,   b. 6 Nov 1835, Beccles, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15th June 1902, Maskeliya,Ceylon Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years)
     2. John Joseph Grigg,   b. 3 Nov 1836, Beccles, Suffock Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11th April 1855, Wartling East Sussex Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 18 years)
     3. Jemima Stokes Grigg,   b. 30th August1837, Beccles, Suffock Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14th July 1906, Bedford,Bedfordshire Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 69 years)
     4. Mary Ann Grigg,   b. 17th Septemer 1838, Beccles, Suffock Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Jan 1922, Bedford,Bedfordshire Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years)
     5. William Chapman Grigg,   b. 26th November1839, Little Walsingham,Norffolk,England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12th March1900, Wynberg Hospital,South Africa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 61 years)
    +6. Henry Bidewell Grigg,   b. 7 Jun 1841, Theberton, Suffock Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Apr 1895, Cochin-Madras India Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 53 years)
     7. Christiana Nattle Grigg,   b. 20 Nov 1842, Horton, Van Deimen's Land Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1880, Keynsham.co.Somerset Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 37 years)
    +8. Lt.Col Edward Evans Grigg,   b. 21 Mar 1844, Horton,Van Deimen's Land Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3rd April 1909, Stevenage Heretford Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 65 years)
    Last Modified 19 Apr 2015 
    Family ID F31  Group Sheet

    Family 2 Eliza Jane,   b. 1815, Whitby, Yorkshire,England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married Aft 1863 
    Last Modified 8 May 2014 
    Family ID F53  Group Sheet

  • Photos


  • Notes 
    • [IT:Rev. Thomas died at the Family Estate Theberton, Maskelyia Ceylon
      on the eve of his return to England.:IT]
      "A tombstone in the church yard of the ALL SAINTS CHURCH,MASKELIYA
      bears the following inscription.- Quote. "Feb 29,1884- The Revd Thomas
      Nattle Grigg ,BA.,Cantab.,Late Rector of Lambley, Nott. Died at
      Theberton, Maskeliya, on the eve of his departure for home Aged 73"
      Unquote.

      [IT:Reverand Thomas Nattle Grigg personal estate £11,256-4-7,
      11/8/1884,
      Resworn May 1885, £10,867-16-9.
      The will with a codicil of the Reverand Thomas Nattle Grigg late of
      Bishop's Startford in the County of Hertford and of Theberton Estate
      Maskelyia in the Island of Ceylon, Clerk who died 29th. February 1884
      at Theberton Estate was proved at the Principal Registry by Jemima
      Stokes Grigg of Bishops Stortford, Spinster the daughter the sole
      Executrix.
      Counsel is of the opinion that the will of the above deceased under
      which the English Estate passes, is that on the death of Miss Mary Ann
      Grigg, the remaining Moiety of the Capital became divisible into
      twentieths. five twentieths going to Sir Edward William Macleay Grigg
      the only child of the late Mr Henry Bidwell Grigg, five twentieths
      going equally between the seven children of the late Mr Thomas James
      Grigg who were living at the death of Miss M A Grigg, four twentieths
      going equally between the four children of the late Mrs Christiana
      Nattle Byrde who were living at the death of Miss M A Grigg. This
      would be a division along the lines that were adopted at the death of
      Miss Jemima Stokes Grigg, when own moiety of the estate was
      distributed, all parties at the time being sui juris.
      Counsel has advised, however, that owing to the obscurity of the
      language of the will and to the fact that the children of the late
      Revd, Louis Byrde are infants and are therefore unable to enter into
      any binding agreement, the Trustees cannot safely distribute the
      remaining moiety of the Trust Property without the sanction of an
      Order of the Court,
      The Trustees will apply to the Court by Orginating Summons to
      ascertain whether the Estate is divisable as the above or otherwise it
      is divisable, and all beneficiaries who are out of the juristiction
      must autherise Solicitors within the jurisdiction to enter appearances
      for them. we act for the trustees and it will save considerable
      expense if we are instructed to act for the beneficiaries also.
      The remainding moiety of the English Estate consists of the
      following:
      2538 pounds advanced on morgage of Theberton 380 pounds Bengal Dooars
      Railway Ordinary Stocks 109 pounds 6/6 Freehold rent charged on
      property at St Georges, Bristol ( at 15 years purchase would produce
      about 1600 pounds)
      ------------------------------------- Revd T N Grigg, deceased Final
      distribution of English Estates - October 31 1925
      Realisation of sale of freehold ground rents St George's Bristol in 18
      lots, 1712 pounds.
      Cash rents on above 90 pounds less expences leaves 1676 pounds to
      distribute.
      1/4 to Sir Edward Grigg as only child of Henry Bidwell Grigg , 1/4 to
      the children of Col E E Grigg in equal shares 1/4 to the children of
      Mr Thomas James Grigg in equal shares 1/4 to the children of Mrs C N
      Byrde.in equal shares .
      Thomas Nattle Grigg Trust was established in Ceylon to provide
      income for his descendants from Theberton Estate, Maskalyia, Ceylon.
      Document from 1926 outlines the beneficiaries at that date.
      :IT]

      [IT:He was a student at Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England, 1833
      School; St Johns and St Peters Cambridge Alumni Thomas Nattle Grigg,
      adm sigar at St Johns Jan.26 1826, of Cornwall.
      School, Devenport Matric Michs 1828, migrated to Peterhouse Feb. 10
      1829. BA 1833. Ordained Deacon (Norwich) Sep 23 1838.
      Priest Jan 5 1840, Chaplain Van Diemen's Land Co 1841, Vicor of St
      George Bristol 1857-73 Rector of Lambley, Notts, 1873-83. Lived
      Subsequently at Bishops Storford,Herts. Died Feb 29 1884, aged 73 at
      Theberton Estate, Maskelyia, Ceylon on the eve of his departure for
      England.
      ( T.A.Walker , 436; Crockford ;Scott MSS ; The Guardian, March 5
      1884 , Church of England Mag.)
      Appointed Chaplian of the Van Diemen's Land Co in 1841.
      (Quote) BUILDING THE FIRST TOWN
      By 1890 the Stanley Institute ' had 1100 volumes. Education was
      another pressing community need and Stanley enjoyed the distinction of
      being the first North-West Coast town to have a school, established by
      the VDL Co. despite several hurdles and a short-lived controversy over
      fees.
      The company brought out an Anglican clergyman from London in 1841,
      engaging the Rev. Thomas N. Grigg with the intention that he would
      also conduct a company school for about 30 school-age children from
      among 40 youngsters at the settlement. The chosen schoolmaster, Martin
      McHale, was found to be incompetent on the voyage out and another
      indented servant, William Tagg, previously a schoolmaster in England
      and performing similar duties on the barque Emu, was appointed at a
      salary of £20 a year and any fees he could earn from tuition in his
      spare time. McHale later worked as a labourer, buying a block at
      Stanley in 1852. Tagg also had a brief teaching career and was
      dismissed for `gross misconduct' leaving Grigg to carry on.
      .
      It was generally agreed that the need for a school was pressing, both
      for the `idle children' and to help the company maintain a stable
      workforce. With the arrival of Rev. Grigg, immediate steps were taken
      to establish classes, though the issue of school fees was looming as
      the next barrier. The company proposed fees of 6d per child a week or
      4d per child for families with two or more children in attendance;
      however, parents asserted that they had been promised the school would
      be free, a claim supported by Rev. Grigg and a matter on which Curr
      had been given no instructions. The imposition of a fee had been a
      tactical move by Curr, who had discovered that the Van Diemen's Land
      Government was spending £ 10 000 a year on day schools and that their
      regulations showed they were legally bound to establish one at
      Circular Head.
      Having every right therefore to expect that on a proper application
      being submitted they would at once make ours a government school, we
      decided to adopt their regulations as closely as possible from the
      commencement.'
      ( BUILDING THE FIRST TOWN)
      Early in 1842, Curr called most of the parents to a meeting at his
      house and outlined the proposal, with Rev. Grigg persuading them to
      accept fees by subscribing £5 a year towards expenses to be shared
      amongst them. They promised to have the fees deducted from their
      wages.
      Curr faced yet another test in paving the way for the company school
      to become a day school, spending considerable time
      convincing Rev. Grigg to have anything to do with a school in which,
      according to regulations for Government facilities, no catechism was
      permitted and no scriptures were to be expounded.
      On 6 January, the first day of school, however, many parents reneged
      on their agreement and only 19 children turned up. After
      prolonged discussion, the company agreed to make it a charity school
      and formal education began in earnest at Circular Head, with the
      company largely paying expenses. In 1846, Curr's original plans were
      realised when it became a `penny a day'school under a State-wide
      system whereby the Government paid a daily penny per child to church
      authorities, mainly Anglican, who conducted most of Tasmania's
      schools. Wood's Almanac of 1849 lists an enrolment of 30 at the
      Stanley Public Day School.
      "[IT:Attempts to establish a European culture in the wilderness had
      begun with the district's earliest residents,
      who were well-satisfied with milestones like the formation of a
      library in the early 1840s. Conceived by
      'gentlemen of the establishment' and subsidised by them, it included
      books, testaments and Bibles sent out
      from London. By 1890 the Stanley Institute had I 100 volumes.
      Education was another pressing
      community need and Stanley enjoyed the distinction of being the first
      North-West Coast town to have a
      school, established by the VanDiemans Land Co. despite several hurdles
      and a short-lived controversy over fees.
      From the 1840s onwards Stanley nurtured the hopes of worshippers
      seeking churches as a focus for a
      diversity of faiths. Rev.Thomas Nattle Grigg carried out the Church of
      England ministry over a vast district, from the
      Blythe River to Woolnorth. For the first few years after proclamation
      Stanley had no church, though the
      Highfield chapel on the nearby Green Hills continued in private use.
      The original church of St. Paul was
      built in 1846 and the stone structure was consecrated in 1858 by
      Bishop Nixon, the first Bishop of
      Tasmania. It was later demolished due to a structural fault
      and.replaced by the existing weatherboard
      building."
      (Unquote)
      :IT]
      Thomas and family travelled to Tasmania aboard ("Emu") Stanley
      Circular Head, arrived Dec. 1841 with wife and four [IT:children.
      "Like many early towns, Stanley could measure its prosperity in the
      number of its hotels and the business they enjoyed. Licences were
      first issued locally by a licensing court established at Stanley in
      1849 and having jurisdiction over the district of Horton. The first
      annual general meeting of the Justices of Peace was held at the police
      office on 1 September and the court included chairman Andrew Mowbray;
      deputy clerk of peace, William Horatio Walsh, also postmaster and
      schoolmaster; John Lee Archer P.M.; Rev. Thomas.Nattle Grigg; and
      James Gibson's brother, William. Local applicants were Michael Lyons,
      William Borradale,James Ferguson and John Whitbread. All were
      successful, with Lyons licensed to conduct the Shamrock Inn, which
      became the Ship Inn in 1854 under proprietor, Thomas House, the
      Stanley Hotel in 1888 under Jane Kay, and the Bay View in 1906, with
      Henry J. Austin the proprietor. It continued to operate as the Bay
      View Hotel till it was delicensed in June 1972, with Ewen Trenerry its
      final p:IT]roprietor".
      [IT:He resided in Circular Head, Tasmania, Australia 1842. Census
      Circular Head, 1842:IT]
      Bought land at Forest,North Western Tasmania as an investment.
      He bought property in Lerderberg, Victoria, August 1849.
      Leased Pastoral run Aug 1849-
      July 1853 Lerderberg.Victoria
      Moeep ,Victoria,1849
      Borhoneyghurk East ,Victoria 1849-1856 18,000 Acres
      He resided in Portland, Victoria 1851 . Thomas travelled to England,
      March 1852. Departed Melbourne with wife and family in March 1852
      aboard "Northumberland":IT]
    • Regarding Thomas? Indenture. He signed up for five years initially and extended his term once but I don?t know whether things were the same for him in his employ for the second term.
      From the VDL Co. dispatches. Thomas was the replacement for a sick Revd. E Pizey at the last moment. The barque EMU had to be held for a while to get things in order and the vessel arrived in Stanley on 19th Dec. 1841. Rev?d Grigg had been recommended to the VDL Co. by Society for the Propagating the Gospel. By June of 1842 the VDL Co HQ in London had received a letter from Society for the Propagating the Gospel in Foreign Parts soliciting Subscriptions.
      On 31st July 1856 Thomas? successor in Tasmania, B. Fookes, wrote a letter to Thomas addressed to The Revd. T. N. Grigg, Watling Vickarage Sussex.
      As a result of this letter Thomas Grigg wrote a letter to the VDL Co in London. It is dated 26 Nov 1856 and he gave his address as Pierre Peree(?), Guernsey.
      Grigg followed up his first letter with additional matter on the same subject from the same address dated 2nd Dec 1856.
      Thomas Grigg was in Tasmania while extensive changes were taking place within the VDL Co.
      He was an influential member of the Circular Head District.
      There maybe more details Tasmanian archives that I haven?t come across as yet
      During my research I have got to know Thomas Nattle Grigg quite well and it is therefore a slice of ?deja vu? to have your contact